Tag Archives: Leaders

THE RIGHTEOUS ONES

Publishing a site such as the Outlaw brings with it a certain responsibility, not only to it’s readers and those who comment here, but also to the people who wish to remain anonymous and have contacted the site looking for answers to any number of questions.

Of course, it would be physically impossible for anyone to be able to answer questions in a manner that would satisfy everybody, but whenever I can, I always endeavor to steer people towards more knowledgeable folk, or credible agencies who are able to help with queries that I cannot adequately deal with.

Sometimes though, when the same question is being asked by a number of people, I will usually try to formulate a response, by way of a published article on the Outlaw, such as the one you are about to read.

One of the questions I have been asked the most lately, and not only on this site but by way of private messages on social media, and which appears to be troubling a lot of people at the present time is;

 

 

Now, I am not going to claim that I am able to offer a definitive answer by any means, but as it’s a question that has been asked by so many people, it’s not something that I can comfortably ignore.

It would have helped, of course to have been furnished with some background as to why this question would be asked, or in what context the query has arisen …. but in the absence of said background, I shall assume that’s it’s more of a generalized question and is not related to any specific event or named person.

There can be any number of reasons why anyone would purposely spread disinformation or falsehoods online, and I will use as only one example of many, many more, the recent re-emergence of people who are desperately trying to push the belief that ‘Satanic Ritual Abuse’ is a cast iron reality, despite the clear lack of evidence that would be needed to support such a theory.

For the record, I have not met with, or have had contact with a single genuine survivor of abuse who supports the idea that SRA exists, ever, and many survivors are in fact, very angry that this issue is being pushed in such an aggressive way online, that it has effectively drowned out the voices of genuine survivors.

The mass media hasn’t helped with this at all, as it has simply tarred all survivors with the same brush, perhaps as a means to discredit the genuine accounts from gaining any real traction?

Claims of SRA have emerged every decade or so, and had it’s heyday in the 1980s when there appeared to have been a worldwide epidemic of alleged incidences of SRA – which may have arisen from law enforcement agencies’ system-wide failure to prosecute the sexual abuse of children up to and during the 1970s.

Or, it could have been due to the methods in which child abuse was reported being updated, and in America the Department of Justice had a great deal of success in prosecuting the purveyors of Child pornography after finally stepping up to the plate by the 1980s after years of lobbying by campaigners.

Whatever the reason may be, and over the last couple of years, increasingly lurid and truly shocking SRA narratives have emerged, and the number of allegations have increased exponentially.

So why is it happening, who is responsible, and what is the objective?

In regard to the people responsible, it could be as simple as the reporting of lurid, and unspeakably horrible tales always attract an audience, and as with any audience, the opportunity to cash in will present itself, inasmuch as the more traffic a website receives, if that website is also ‘monetized’ …. then the motive becomes only too obvious.

But what about those people who do not appear to have a financial incentive, what is their motivation?

In order to answer that, I believe that it’s important to look at the people themselves, and at what could be interpreted as the ‘righteous zeal’ that often accompanies their online (and offline) behavior.

The greater majority of these people are without a doubt, ‘believers’, and will continue to believe in everything they are saying and doing regardless of the repercussions, the possible consequences or the implausibility of their claims.

I do not believe, however, that these ‘beliefs’ simply appeared to them one day, that they woke up one morning and decided to set out on some kind of divine mission to covert anyone who would listen, into believing as they do – I am of the firm opinion that what they now believe, was put in their heads, and purposely so.

How is that possible?

When you look a little closer at some these people, it is quite easy to work out that they all fit within a certain demographic; they are very similar in a number of ways, and one of those ways is that they all display certain characteristics …. traits, if you prefer, that are not immediately obvious to those who do not possess manipulative tendencies bordering on the sociopathic, or happen to be malignant narcissists.

People who are desperate for attention, who really want to fit in or belong to something, are possibly vulnerable in some way, and who may also have some underlying or obvious mental health issues and spent most of their lives being socially isolated for example, are ideal targets for sociopaths and narcissists, who are themselves quite expert at seeking out such people, and by their very nature will then use them to their own ends.

I am not talking about the organ grinders here, the string-pullers and the so-called ‘big hitters’ of the alternative media like Icke, Gerrish, Spivey and the like, as their agenda’s are screamingly obvious to all, or should be by now at least – the people I am going to highlight here are the ‘hangers on’ , who follow them and breathe in every word they say and treat it as some sort of quasi-religious experience.

The late Richard Webster described it perfectly when he wrote:

‘Although some observers might feel that the kind of righteousness described here is at odds with the indifference to the truth which Taylor appears sometimes to have shown, to think in this manner is to fail to understand what might be called  ‘the psychology of righteousness’. For throughout human history the pattern of conduct displayed by those people who seem to be motivated by a burning conviction in the rightness of a particular cause has been disturbing. Again and again it becomes apparent that those whose consciousness is dominated by feelings of righteousness, appear to be psychologically incapable of weighing the moral significance of individual acts according to any calculus, other than one derived from their own most passionate beliefs. Indeed, feelings of righteousness sometimes play such a role in an individual’s self-image that they overpower ordinary moral sensitivity. Such feelings make it psychologically difficult to acknowledge even the possibility that any action taken in pursuit of an aim which is considered right could conceivably be bad or immoral.’

My own thoughts on this are that a person of the ‘type’ I outlined above, and who desperately wants, and needs to fit in and be a part of something which is infinitely more attractive and exciting than anything that has happened in their own lives thus far …. are very, very easy to manipulate.

Whenever I see these disparate groups promoting these type of stories, and the way they defend both their own and each other’s behavior, it puts me in mind of something that I spent some time studying almost forty years ago, and makes more sense to me in regard to this than almost anything else I have been able to find online.

A group of Jack The Ripper enthusiasts were discussing the ubiquitous ‘Royal Killer’ theory in 1979, where the subject of John Netley ‘The Phantom Coachman’ came up, and the group looked at every possible reason why such a nondescript little man, a complete ‘Nobody’ and petty criminal, could have been persuaded to perform what were some pretty gruesome tasks.

Netley, for those of you who are unfamiliar with the story, was the man who was named by the Author Stephen Knight as being the man who lured the victims of Jack The Ripper into a coach he was asked to drive, which contained (allegedly) both the Ripper (Queen Victoria’s personal physician) and an accomplice.

Netley was sworn to obedience, according to Knight, by being made to believe (by the Freemasons) that he was being asked to perform a  ‘Great Task’, his participation was vital and would benefit not only the whole population, but the Crown itself was under threat if he refused.

He genuinely believed, out of the thousands of other coach drivers that operated in London in 1888, that he had been specifically ‘chosen to undertake a special task which was a matter of National Security.’

For a man like Netley, who had been scraping a living at the very bottom of the social scale his entire life, and who had desperately wanted, with every fibre of his being, to be accepted, even welcomed into the very society he had watched for many years with envious eyes – the decision was easy.

He did it ….

Even though Mr Knights version of the Ripper story has long been discounted as a work of fiction, and John Netley probably never even existed, the basic premise is sound, inasmuch as anyone like Netley, who hovers around the type of people he admires and aspires to be accepted by, is easy prey to the manipulators and morally bankrupt types who operate within the higher end of both the alternative, and to a degree, the mass media.

And that is even before you begin to consider other agencies who operate on behalf of the establishment, using similar tactics to ‘plant stories’, spread false information and effectively muddy the waters online to distract, confuse and redirect attention elsewhere.

Something to consider perhaps?

Oh! And in case you were were wondering what happened to Mr Netley?

He was killed after being run over by his own carriage, less than a week after the last victim of Jack The Ripper, Mary Kelly, was discovered.

The coroners verdict was one of ‘Accidental Death’….

WHAT A CULT?

DESTRUCTIVE TRAITS OF CULT LEADERS

By Joe Navarro M.A.

One of the questions that I am often asked by students of criminology and psychology is how do you know when a cult leader is “evil” or “bad”?

These of course are vague descriptors to some extent but I get the question, “When is a cult leader pathological or, better said, a danger to others?”

This is a valid question in view of the historical record of suffering and hurt caused by various cult leaders around the world.

I am sure others have addressed this issue before and I realize that it comes with its own minefield as many religions started out as cults – I am simply not going to enter that fray. But the question is valid from the point of view that there are people out there who are cult leaders and who do great harm to others emotionally, psychologically, spiritually, physically, or financially.

From my studies of cults and cult leaders during my time in the FBI, I learned early on that there are some things to look for that, at a minimum, say caution, this individual is dangerous, and in all likelihood will cause harm to others.

Having studied at length the life, teachings, and behaviors of Jim Jones (Jonestown Guyana), David Koresh (Branch Davidians), Stewart Traill (The Church of Bible Understanding), Charles Manson, Shoko Asahara (Aum Shinrikyo), Joseph Di Mambro (The Order of the Solar Temple aka Ordre du Temple Solaire), Marshall Heff Applewhite (Heaven’s Gate), Bhagwan Rajneesh (Rajneesh Movement), and Warren Jeffs (polygamist leader), what stands out about these individuals is that they were or are all pathologically narcissistic.

They all have or had an over-abundant belief that they were special, that they and they alone had the answers to problems, and that they had to be revered. They demanded perfect loyalty from followers, they overvalued themselves and devalued those around them, they were intolerant of criticism, and above all they did not like being questioned or challenged. And yet, in spite of these less than charming traits, they had no trouble attracting those who were willing to overlook these features.

These personality traits stand out as the first warning to those who would associate with them, but there are many others. Here is a collection of traits that I have collected over the years about cult leaders that give us hints as to their psychopathology. This list is not all-inclusive nor is it the final word on the subject; it is merely my personal collection based on my studies and interviews that I conducted in my previous career.

If you know of a cult leader who has many of these traits there is a high probability that they are hurting those around them emotionally, psychologically, physically, spiritually, or financially.

And of course this does not take into account the hurt that their loved ones will also experience.

Here are the typical traits of the pathological cult leader (from Dangerous Personalities) you should watch for and which shout caution, get away, run, or avoid if possible:

  • He/she has a grandiose idea of who they are and what they can achieve.
  • Is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, or brilliance.
  • Demands blind unquestioned obedience from his/her followers.
  • Requires excessive admiration from their followers and outsiders.
  • Has a sense of entitlement – expecting to be treated special at all times.
  • Is exploitative of others by asking for their money or that of their relatives putting others at financial risk.
  • Is arrogant, smug and haughty in his/her behavior or attitude.
  • Has an exaggerated sense of power (entitlement) that allows him to bend rules and break laws.
  • Takes sexual advantage of members of his/her followers/cult members.
  • Sex is a requirement with adults and sub adults as part of a ritual or rite. (Is also obsessed with sex and sexual perversions of all description)
  • Is hypersensitive to how he/she is seen or perceived by others.
  • Publicly devalues others as being inferior, incapable, or not worthy.
  • Makes followers/members confess their sins or faults publicly subjecting them to ridicule or humiliation while revealing exploitable weaknesses of the penitent.
  • Has ignored the needs of others, including: biological, physical, emotional, and financial needs.
  • Is frequently boastful of his/her own accomplishments.
  • Always needs to be the center of attention and does things to distract others to insure that he/she is being noticed by arriving late, wearing flashy clothing, overdramatic speech, or by making theatrical entrances.
  • Has insisted in always having the best of anything (house, car, jewelry, clothes) even when his followers are relegated to lesser facilities, amenities, or clothing.
  • Doesn’t appear to listen well to needs of others, communication is usually one-way in the form of dictates.
  • Haughtiness, grandiosity, and the need to be controlling is part of his/her personality.
  • Behaves as though people are objects to be used, manipulated or exploited for personal gain.
  • When criticized or questioned he/she tends to lash out not just with anger but with venomous rage.
  • Anyone who criticizes or questions him/her is instantly deemed an “enemy.”
  • Refers to non-followers or non-believers as “the enemy.”
  • Acts totally imperious at times, not wishing to know what others think or desire.
  • Believes him/herself to be omnipotent.
  • Claims to have “magical” answers or solutions to problems.
  • Is superficially charming.
  • Habitually puts down others as being inferior and only they are superior.
  • Has a certain coldness or aloofness about him/her that makes others worry about who this person really is and or whether they really know him.
  • Is deeply offended when there are perceived signs of boredom, being ignored, followers drifting away or of being slighted in some way.
  • Treats others with complete contempt and arrogance.
  • Is constantly watching and asessing those who are a threat or those who revere him.
  • The word “I” dominates his/her conversations/writings. He/she is totally oblivious to how often he references himself.
  • Hates to be embarrassed or fail publicly – when he/she does they respond with rage.
  • Doesn’t seem to feel guilty for anything he/she has done wrong nor does he/she ever apologize for their actions.
  • Believes he/she possesses all of the answers and solutions to their own countries or world problems.
  • Believes himself/herself to be a deity or a chosen representative of a deity.
  • Rigid, unbending, or insensitive towards how any other person thinks.
  • Tries to control others in everything they do, read, view, or think.
  • Has isolated members of his cult from contact with family, friends or the outside world.
  • Monitors and or restricts contact with family or outsiders.
  • Works the least but always demands the most.
  • Has stated that he/she is “destined for greatness” or that he will be “martyred.”
  • Appears to be deeply dependent on praise and adoration and will often fish for compliments.
  • Uses enforcers or willing sycophants to insure absolute compliance and obedience from followers.
  • Sees him/herself as an “unstoppable force” perhaps has even said so.
  • Conceals their own background or family connections which would disclose how plain or ordinary he/she is.
  • Doesn’t think there is anything wrong with himself/herself – in fact they see themselves as perfection or “blessed” in some way.
  • Has taken away the freedom to leave, to travel, to pursue life, and liberty of followers.
  • Has isolated his/her followers physically (moved to a remote area) so as to not be observed.

When the question is asked, “When do we know when a cult leader is bad, or evil, or toxic?”

The above list is what I use to survey the cult leader for dangerous traits.

Of course the only way to know anything for sure is to observe and validate, but these characteristics can go a long way to help with that.

And as I have said, there are other things to look for and there may be other lists, but this is the one that I found most useful from studying these groups and talking to former members of cults.

When a cult or organizational leader has a preponderance of these traits then we can anticipate that at some point those who associate with him will likely suffer physically, emotionally, psychologically, or financially.

If these traits sound familiar to leaders, groups, sects, or organizations known to you then expect those who associate with them to live in despair and to suffer even if they don’t know it.

PSYCHOLOGY TODAY

Article first published August 25th 2012

Joe Navarro, M.A. is a 25 year veteran of the FBI and is the author of ‘What Every Body is Saying’, as well as ‘Dangerous Personalities’.