Tag Archives: Climate Change

LOOKING TO HISTORY

Something that has been pointed out to me in regard to this website, a number of times is ‘why does the Outlaw publish so many ‘historical’ posts instead of posting about current events?’

The answer to that is quite simple, and I shall re-iterate what I answered then, which was that many events of today are not ‘new’, and one only has to look to history to find examples of similar or even identical events with which to draw comparisons from.

A case in point is something I happened upon last night, while I was doing some research for the book I am currently putting together about a building of historical interest in Wrexham, north east Wales, when I found an obscure reference to a survey of the Bromfield (Saxon Name) and Yale lordships, that had been undertaken by a Thomas Sheffield in 1315.

After a lot of searching, through books and various archives, I found a Doctorate Thesis in the Aberystwyth University Geography Archive ‘Spatial Patterns in the small town in the nineteenth century – a case study of Wrexham’, written by Sandra Irish B.A. (Hons) which was submitted in August 1987.

On page 102 of that document, there is a reference to this survey, and the date, but I can find little else about it, other than a few anecdotal quotes elsewhere, about ‘Famine’ and rather strangely ‘Cannibalism’.

In Wrexham?

So you know by now how it works, you start off by looking for something and you end up somewhere else, following clues and links and joining dots until you reach a point where you are reading about stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with what you were actually looking for.

Anyway, the anecdotal references I had found to ‘Cannibalism’ piqued my interest somewhat, especially with all the bullshit being promoted around the internet at the moment, with taglines like ‘Baby Eating’ and ‘Satanic Practices’ and ‘Satanic Ritual Abuse’ etc, so locating actual historical evidence of ‘Cannibalism’ on any scale occurring in Britain or mainland Europe, could, and I emphasize the word ‘could’, add some weight to at least some of these claims.

I avoided the ‘Truther’ websites and forums, especially those who are pumping out this kind of stuff regularly, and purposely looked for sources that were both historically ‘Mainstream’, as well as Contemporary therefore would be generally acceptable to the average person.

What I found was interesting, inasmuch as even WIKIPEDIA (although horrendously flawed, is generally the average person’s go-to reference point), has a number of pages about this very subject, but, being part of another historical event, (which admittedly I was not overly familiar with) could be easily overlooked.

Although WIKI makes no reference to the survey I was looking for, what it does mention is an event known as ‘The Great Famine’, which began in 1315 and continued for the next four years, brought great hardship and starvation to much of Europe and ‘Chroniclers of the time noted many incidences of cannibalism’….

‘In the spring of 1315, unusually heavy rain began in much of Europe. Throughout the spring and the summer, it continued to rain, and the temperature remained cool. Under such conditions, grain could not ripen, leading to widespread crop failures. Grain was brought indoors in urns and pots to keep dry. The straw and hay for the animals could not be cured, so there was no fodder for the livestock. The price of food began to rise; prices in England doubled between spring and midsummer. Salt, the only way to cure and preserve meat, was difficult to obtain because brine could not be effectively evaporated in wet weather; its price increased from 30 shillings to 40 shillings. In Lorraine, wheat prices grew by 320% making bread unaffordable to peasants. Stores of grain for long-term emergencies were limited to royalty, lords, nobles, wealthy merchants and the Church. Because of the general increased population pressures, even lower-than-average harvests meant some people would go hungry; there was little margin for failure. People began to harvest wild edible roots, plants, grasses, nuts and bark in the forests.

A number of documented incidents show the extent of the famine. Edward II, King of England, stopped at St Albans on 10 August 1315 and had difficulty finding bread for himself and his entourage; it was a rare occasion in which the King of England was unable to eat. The French, under Louis X, tried to invade Flanders, but in the low country of the Netherlands, the fields were soaked and the army became so bogged down that they were forced to retreat, burning their provisions where they left them, unable to carry them away.

In the spring of 1316, it continued to rain on a European population deprived of energy and reserves to sustain itself. All segments of society from nobles to peasants were affected but especially the peasants, who represented 95% of the population and who had no reserve food supplies. To provide some measure of relief, the future was mortgaged by slaughtering the draft animals, eating the seed grain, abandoning children to fend for themselves (“Hansel and Gretel”) and, among old people, voluntarily refusing food for the younger generation to survive.

*The chroniclers of the time noted many incidents of cannibalism.*

The height of the famine was reached in 1317, as the wet weather continued. Finally, in that summer, the weather returned to its normal patterns. By then, however, people were so weakened by diseases such as pneumonia, bronchitis and tuberculosis, and so much of the seed stock had been eaten, that it was not until 1325 that the food supply returned to relatively normal levels and the population began to increase again. Historians debate the toll, but it is estimated that 10–25% of the population of many cities and towns died. Though the Black Death (1338–1375) would kill more people, it often swept through an area in a matter of months, whereas the Great Famine lingered for years, prolonging the suffering of the populace’. – WIKIPEDIA

That of course does not ‘Prove’ that Cannibalism is practiced today by any means, only that extreme hardship had forced a number of people out of sheer desperation and extreme hunger, to do the unthinkable in order to survive – that appears to be a historical fact.

There is of course the now infamous Sawney Beane case, where an East Lothian native in the 12th Century, along with 47 other members of his murderous and cannibalistic family, were executed:

‘Their crimes were considered so heinous that the normal justice system, for which Scotland is so renowned, was abandoned and the entire family were sentenced to death. The following day the twenty-seven men of the family met a fate similar to that of many of their victims, by having their legs and arms cut off and being left to slowly bleed to death, watched by their women. The twenty-one women were burned like witches in huge fires.’

So even in the 12th Century, cannibalism was considered so heinous a crime that the Scottish  justice system was abandoned.

As many of these recent ‘Baby Eating’ claims are known to be emanating from over the Scottish border, could they be using the Bean case, as it’s local to them as a point of reference?

Because I would bet a pound against a pinch of pig manure that they are not aware of what happened during the ‘Great Famine’, and out of great necessity only.

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Another thing I would like to draw attention to, although it’s unrelated to the eating of people or babies, is another event which happened prior to 1315, (also referred to in the WIKIPEDIA page) and which is believed to have been the cause of the famine:

‘The onset of the Great Famine coincided with the end of the Medieval Warm Period. Between 1310 and 1330, northern Europe saw some of the worst and most sustained periods of bad weather in the entire Middle Ages, characterized by severe winters and rainy and cold summers. The Great Famine may have been precipitated by a volcanic event, perhaps that of Mount Tarawera which lasted about five years.

Changing weather patterns, the ineffectiveness of medieval governments in dealing with crises and population level at a historical high made it a time for little margin for error in food production.’

Which shows that ‘Global Warming’ or ‘Climate Change’ is not a new thing either, it’s a perfectly natural cycle, (every few thousand years) is entirely predictable, and is certainly not ‘ManMade’ as every western Government has claimed for the last decade or so, and that there are not that many things that are entirely ‘New’….

*I will continue searching for the Wrexham Cannibals though, in case you were wondering …. It would make a great story.*

THE HAND OF MAN

When discussing or writing about certain subjects, introducing words like ‘Weather Modification‘, ‘Chemtrails‘, ‘HAARP‘, ‘Geo-Engineering‘ and ‘Weather Wars‘, often have a tendency to still make many people roll their eyes and stare blankly at you, before they switch off altogether and/or hurriedly change the subject.

It should not, therefore, come as a surprise to learn that even after everything that has happened in the past, is happening right in front of us now, and shall no doubt continue unabated in the future – the majority of people will still steadfastly believe only what they read in the mainstream media and see on the television.

Any deviation from the herd mentality, will, more often than not, single the deviant thinker out as being a ‘nutter‘, or as simply being ‘deluded‘, or as many of you have already witnessed in the mainstream media, a full-on, bat-shit crazy, tin foil hat-wearing ‘conspiracy theorist‘.

So, with that in mind, a suggestion that the deaths of thirty five Devonians were the direct result of ‘weather modification’ experiments by scientists and the British military in the 1950’s, would be greeted with the same scepticism and disbelief as is everything that has not been widely reported by the media.

Also, a comparison being drawn between the floods that devastated the Somerset Levels in the winter of 2013/14, and the very recent events witnessed in Cumbria, would no doubt be dismissed as being yet another ‘Conspiracy’, especially by those who are actively pushing an agenda like ‘Climate Change’ for example.

And the mere suggestion that all of these events were avoidable, as they were not natural occurrences, nor were they the result of an ‘Act of God’ but the direct result of a deliberate manipulation of the weather by the hand of man – would be greeted with howls of derision by both the government of the day and the mainstream media, as well as those who subscribe to both views.

But what if evidence of these weather experiments, previously buried in classified government files – had actually been reported on by the mainstream media in August 2001, would that change anything?

Would more people believe it then?

One would hope so….

On August 15, 1952, one of the worst flash floods ever to have occurred in Britain swept through the Devon village of Lynmouth. Thirty-five people died as a torrent of 90m tons of water and thousands of tons of rock poured off saturated Exmoor and into the village destroying homes, bridges, shops and hotels.

The disaster was officially termed “The hand of God” but new evidence from previously classified government files suggests that a team of international scientists working with the RAF was experimenting with artificial rainmaking in southern Britain in the same week and could possibly be implicated.

Squadron Leader Len Otley, who was working on what was known as Operation Cumulus, has told the BBC that they jokingly referred to the rainmaking exercise as Operation Witch Doctor.

His navigator, Group Captain John Hart, remembers the success of these early experiments:

“We flew straight through the top of the cloud, poured dry ice down into the cloud. We flew down to see if any rain came out of the cloud. And it did about 30 minutes later, and we all cheered”.

The meteorological office has in the past denied there were any rainmaking experiments conducted before 1955, but a BBC Radio 4 history investigation, to be broadcast tonight, has unearthed documents recently released at the public record office showing that they were going in from 1949 to 1955.

RAF logbooks and personnel corroborate the evidence.

Until now, the Ministry of Defence has categorically denied knowledge of any cloud-seeding experiments taking place in the UK during August 1952. But documents suggest that Operation Cumulus was going on between August 4 and August 15 1952.

The scientists were based at Cranfield school of Aeronautics and worked in collaboration with the RAF and the MOD’s meteorological research flight based at Farnborough. The chemicals were provided by ICI in Billingham.

Met office reports from these dates describe flights undertaken to collect data on cumulus cloud temperature, water content, icing rate, vertical motions and turbulence, and water droplet and ice crystal formation.

There is no mention of cloud seeding.

But a 59-year-old radio broadcast unearthed by Radio 4 describes an aeronautical engineer and glider pilot, Alan Yates, working with Operation Cumulus at the time and flying over Bedfordshire, spraying quantities of salt. He was elated when the scientists told him that this had led to a heavy downpour 50 miles away over Staines, Middlesex.

“I was told that the rain had been the heaviest for several years – and all out of a sky which looked summery … There was no disguising the fact that the seedsman had said he’d make it rain, and he did. Toasts were drunk to meteorology and it was not until the BBC news bulletin [about Lynmouth] was read later on, that a stony silence fell in the company,” said Mr Yates at the time.

Operation Cumulus was put on hold indefinitely after the tragedy.

Declassified minutes from an air ministry meeting, held in the war office on November 3, 1953, show why the military were interested in increasing rain and snow by artificial means. The list of possible uses includes “bogging down enemy movement”, “incrementing the water flows in rivers and streams to hinder or stop enemy crossings”, and clearing fog from airfields.

The documents also talk of rainmaking having a potential “to explode an atomic weapon in a seeded storm system or cloud. This would produce a far wider area of radioactive contamination than in a normal atomic explosion”.

UK weather modification experiments at the time presaged current practice in the US. The idea was to target “super cool” clouds, and to increase the volume of freezing water particles. Most methods involved firing particles of salt, dry ice, or silver iodide, into clouds, either from an aeroplane or from burners on the ground. The clouds would then precipitate, pulled down below freezing point by the extra weight of dense particles, thus making it rain sooner than it might have done.

Significantly, it was claimed that silver iodide could cause a downpour up to 300 miles away.

Many countries now use the technology, which has considerably improved during the past 50 years.

But controversy still surrounds the efficacy of these early cloud-seeding experiments. In 1955 questions were asked in the Commons about the possibilities of liability and compensation claims. Documents seen by the BBC suggest that both the air ministry and the Treasury became very anxious and were aware that rainmaking could cause damage, not just to military targets and personnel, but also to civilians.

The British Geological Survey has recently examined soil sediments in the district of Lynmouth to see if any silver or iodide residues remain. The testing has been limited due to restrictions in place because if foot and mouth disease, and is inconclusive. However, silver residue has been discovered in the catchment waters of the river Lyn. The BGS will investigate further over the next 18 months.

Survivors of the Lynmouth flood called for – but never got – a full investigation into the causes of the disaster.

Rumours persist to this day of planes circulating before the inundation.